Book Reviews

Reviews of Korean titles published overseas

Book Review Japanese(日本語)

[Japanese] Believing in the Possibilities of “Another Story”: Twelve Women Already Dead by Bak Solmay

by Aoko Matsuda, on April 18, 2022

  • English(English)
  • Japanese(日本語)

Bak Solmay’s TwelveWomen Already Dead is a collection of short stories compiled forpublication especially in Japan. The copy on the book’s bellyband says that theauthor “confronts social issues such as the Gwangju Uprising, the meltdown ofthe Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor, and femicide” with her “uniqueimaginativeness.”

I cried so much I emptied a full box of tissueswhile reading Han Kang’s Human Acts. I saw A Taxi Driver, starring Song Kang-ho, in theaters, andleft with my handkerchief soaked in tears, a newly made fan of Ryu Jun-yeol,who I first saw in that film. Whenever I see or hear the word “Gwangju,” Ithink, I know. I know. What happened there, at least, I know.

“Social issues such as the Gwangju Uprising,the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor, and femicide.” I knowthe stories that are told along with these words, I think. So I prepared myselfmentally before opening this book. No matter how painful the story, I mustaccept it, stand with the victims, and swear anew from the bottom of my heartto never let these atrocities be repeated.

But on those pages, I found a space I had neverimagined spreading out before me. If I were to put it into words, it was aquiet willfulness that refused to simply move the reader, refused to let themcome close.

The characters that appear in Bak’s stories areconfused. So confused that it makes the reader pull back and ask, “Do you haveto be so lost?” There were times when the characters themselves couldn’t accepttheir confusion. A certain credulity I had expected was missing, and thecharacters didn’t feel the things I expected them to feel. The world theylooked upon was in constant flux, and they continued to change as well. Theywouldn’t let me think, I know.

In “Swaying into the Dark Night,” Busan Tower,which the main character is certain should exist in front of Busan Station,vanishes from their mind, transforms, and when they actually visit the spot,has actually disappeared. In “Beloved Dog,” the narrator has no faith in theirrecollection of 1994, which they must have lived through. When they think backto the year, “a variety of feelings and sensations” well up, yet they alsorecall without the slightest emotion “incidents, numbers, and people’s namescarved into my mind by the words I saw in newspapers.” In “The Eyes of Winter,”two characters watch a documentary about the Kori Nuclear Power Plant anddiscuss how they wish they could have seen different kinds of movies. And inthe title piece about femicide, the narrator evades telling us how they feelabout either murdered or living women, including themselves. In “Well, WhatShall We Sing?” the narrator, a Gwangju native joining in an event for studentsin San Francisco interested in learning Korean, listens to the stories toldabout the Gwangju Uprising while thinking about how they had expected “lighter”conversation. On the uprising’s thirtieth anniversary, the narrator visits theSouth Jeolla provincial office building that was the site of a massacre duringthe uprising. They think, “the people who actually know what happened here,maybe they’d tell us another story. Something that we haven’t talked aboutyet.” It seems Bak is always considering the potential of “another story,” thatthere is always “another story” behind everything that happens.

In Japan, when someone creates a fictional workportraying actual incidents or events, I often see the “timing” of taking upthose topics debated on social media. Isn’t it too early? It’s not yet over forthe people who experienced it, they say. But these incidents never end.Suffering and sadness don’t heal with the passing of time, and events that havebred resentment in society are always passed on and stay in this world.Strictly speaking, there’s no such thing as perfect timing.

If that’s the case, maybe one way an author canapproach fiction with “integrity” is by quietly placing “another story” in somecorner of this world. “Another story,” different from what we are all convincedwe know. Bak writes about the lives of those of us who, in the face of theseatrocities, cannot turn back time or save those who have lost their lives, whohave no choice but to go on living out their lives in the places where thoseatrocities happened, where they still happen, and where they sometimesseem—though maybe not—to have come to terms with this past. The “other stories”she creates have a sedating effect, returning those of us who always wind upthinking “we know” back to a state of ignorance. Of course it is important toknow history and the facts, but it is not a bad thing to be forced to remember,“That’s right, I don’t know anything.” And that is how these stories will makeyou feel.

 

 

Translated by Kalau Almony

 

Aoko Matsuda

Author, Wherethe Wild Ladies Are (Soft Skull Press, 2020)


パク・ソルメの『もう死んでいる十二人の女たちと』は、日本オリジナル短編集である。本の帯には、「光州事件、福島第一原発事故、女性殺人事件などの社会問題」に、「独創的な想像力」で作者が「対峙」していると記されている。

 私はハン・ガンの『少年が来る』を読んでティッシュの箱を一つ空っぽにしたほど泣いた。ソン・ガンホ主演の『タクシードライバー』を見るために映画館に行き、持っていたハンカチをびしょびしょにし、この作品ではじめて見たリュ・ジュンヨルのファンになって帰った。

そんな私は、「光州」という言葉を見聞きするたびに、知っている、と思う。知っている、私はそこで何が起こったか、少なくとも知っている、と。

「光州事件、福島第一原発事故、女性殺人事件などの社会問題」という言葉とともに語られる物語を、私は、知っている、と思う。だから、私は心の準備をして、この本のページを開いた。どれだけつらい物語であろうと、私はしっかり受け止め、被害者に寄り添い、同じことを決して繰り返さないと改めて心に誓うのだと。

しかし、ページの中には、そこには、私が想像していなかった空間が広がっていた。言ってみれば、簡単に読者の心を動かしてやらない、寄り添わせてやらない、といった、静かな意思。

パク・ソルメの短編たちに登場する人々は戸惑っている。こんなにも戸惑うのか、とこっちがたじろぐほど、戸惑う。時には、戸惑うことさえ自らに許さない。ある、ことが当然だったはずのものがなく、当然感じるはずの感情を彼らは感じない。彼らが見る光景はゆらゆら揺れ続け、彼ら自身も揺れ続ける。知っている、と私に思わせてくれない。

「暗い夜に向かってゆらゆらと」の中で、釜山駅前に確かに存在しているはずの釜山タワーは、登場人物の脳内で輪郭を失い、変形し、実際に訪れてみると、そこにない。「愛する犬」では、自分が確かに通り過ぎたはずの「94年」の記憶に、語り手は自信を持てない。語り手が「94年」を思い返すと、当時の自分の「いろいろな気分と感情」が思い浮かぶが、同時に「新聞で見た活字のせいで頭に刻み込まれている事件、数字や人の名前」を何の感慨もなく思い出す。「冬のまなざし」で古里原子力発電所のドキュメンタリーを見た二人は、もっとこんな映画が見たかったと語り合い、フェミサイドを題材にした表題作で、語り手の女性は殺された女性たち、生きている女性たちについて語らない。「じゃあ、何を歌うんだ」では、サンフランシスコで韓国語に興味がある学生たちが集まる会に参加した、光州出身の語り手は、そこで語られる光州事件について耳を傾けながら、もっと「軽い話」をするのかと思っていた、と思う。事件から三十年目の記念の日に殺戮の現場となった光州の旧道庁を訪れた語り手は、「本当にここで何があったのか知っている人たちは、別の話をしてくれるかもしれない。今までの話とは別の話を」と考える。パク・ソルメは常に「別の話」の可能性を念頭に置いているように思える、あらゆる出来事に、「別の話」があるのだと。

日本では、実際に起こった事件や出来事をフィクションとして描く際に、それらを題材として取り上げるタイミングがしばしばSNSなどでも議論されるのを目にする。早すぎるのではないか、遺された人々にとってはまだ終わっていないのだからと。しかし、事件や出来事が終わることなどない。苦しみや悲しみは時が経ったら癒えるものではないし、社会に消えぬ遺恨を残した事件は語り継がれることで、この世に残り続ける。厳密には、ちょうどいいタイミングなどないのだ。

ならば、作者にできるフィクションへの「誠実」な態度は、その対象への「別の話」をこの世界の片隅にそっと置くことではないか。私たちが知っていると思い込んでいるのとは違う、「別の話」を。起こったことに対して、時を巻き戻すことも、今さら犠牲者を助けることもできない我々、しかしそれらが起こった場所で、今起こっている場所で、自分の生活を続けるしかない、そのことに折り合いがついているような、ついていないような人々の生を、パク・ソルメは書く。彼女が生み出す「別の話」には、ついつい知っている気になってしまう我々を、知らない自分にもう一度立ち戻らせる鎮静効果がある。もちろん知ることは大切だが、同時に、そうだった、自分は何も知らない、と知っているのも悪くない。そんな気持ちにさせられるのだ。

 

Aoko Matsuda

Author, Where the Wild Ladies Are (Soft Skull Press, 2020)


Keyword : Twelve Women Already Dead ,もう死んでいる十二人の女たちと,Bak Solmay,パク・ソルメ

Book's Info
Author's Info
[WriterVO : { rowPerPage : 0, start : 0, end : 0, searchTarget : null, searchKeyword : null, filter : []}]
Original Work's info

Translated Books1