Translated Books

We continually collect and provide bibliographic information on overseas publications of Korean literature (translated into over 48 languages).

5 results
  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book Available

    Lee Yun-gi et al / 이윤기 et al / 2015 / KDC구분 > literature > Periodical

    Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 8 (2015) Posted on 8 June 2015 by pwilson6 | Leave a comment Editor’s Note David R. McCann, ix In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Once again, readers will discover a rich and varied array of contemporary Korean literary and image work in the current issue of Azalea journal. We celebrate the 100th anniversary of the births of two of the twentieth century’s great Korean writers, Midang Sŏ Chŏngju, the poet, and Hwang Sunwŏn, the short story and novel writer. Periodically, as the cultural, political, and historical tides in Korea have fallen and risen only to fall and rise again, these two writers have been lionized, denigrated, taken as emblems of Korea’s literary capabilities and accomplishments, or set to the side as passé, out-of-sync, politically unacceptable, or just too old to matter. Yet readers will find a rich array of reflections on these two writers and examples of their literary accomplishments. May you savor and treasure. Let us resolve to keep these writers central to our understanding of the terrain that Korean literature traversed in the twentieth century and to comprehend how much it would lose if it did not value, even treasure, these and others in the twenty-first.     Writer in Focus: Lee Eyunkee   Translator’s Note Tahee Lee, 1 In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Lee Eyunkee, or Yi Yun-gi as published in Germany, is admittedly better known in Korea for his translations and non-fiction works on Greek and Roman mythology than his works of fiction or essays. This, however, does not reflect the emphasis he placed on, or the time and effort he poured into, writing fiction. In one of his essays, explaining his decision in 1991 to scale down his translating career and leave for the United States, he admits: “Translating was important to me. But it wasn’t the most important work for me. “I had debuted in 1977 as a writer, but since publishing my first collection of short stories in 1988, I hadn’t written a single proper novel. The trifling reputation and fairly good money I earned as a translator were holding me back by the ankle.” (“To Crawl the Bottom” from Writing That Makes Zorba Dance) He confesses in the same essay that when he returned to Korea temporarily to receive the Dong-in Literary Award in 1998 he thought that the years he spent abroad “let him come back to being a writer.”   The Bow Tie Lee Eyunkee and Tahee Lee, 5 In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Unless you live in a small country where there are only a handful of schools, it would be extremely rare for you to have a lifelong classmate, someone who went to the same school with you from elementary school through middle and high school all the way up to college. Yet I do have such a rare friend. His name is Pak Nosu. There are people in this world who give the school system too much credit and think Pak Nosu and I would be similar in our ways of thinking and behaving, but that is not true. A man does not stand alone. I think each man has a universal subconscious which preserves everything from his family’s household history to the history of humanity. That is why I consider education to be ancillary—like bridesmaids and groomsmen at a wedding—when a man faces the times by himself. It was probably the times that made me a lifelong schoolmate of my friend Pak Nosu whose portrait I am now going to attempt to paint by stippling. An event considered coincidental in one era might turn out to be inevitable in another. The characteristics of an age often blur the line between chance and necessity. When Nosu and I were in school, it was considered a virtue for a man’s personal and social values to be completely consistent with those of others. In that age, men hesitated to step out of the bounds of shared values if they could help it. In that age, there was one sure formula: Don’t get any ideas into your head! If you were branded “the kid with ideas,” the road to recovery was going to be a long one. Imagination was a dangerous thing.       Notes on Contributors, 406   Source: https://uhpjournals.wordpress.com/2015/06/08/azalea-journal-of-korean-literature-culture-vol-8-2015/

  • 数学者の朝
    Japanese(日本語) Book

    Kim So Yeon et al / 김소연 / 2023 / -

    見えない場所、聞こえない声、いまだない言葉 語りえない物語のために 詩が広く愛されている韓国において 文学性と社会性を兼ね備え、深く心に刻まれる詩を紡ぐ キム・ソヨンの単著詩集を初邦訳。 source: https://www.hanmoto.com/bd/isbn/9784910214504

  • 奥歯を噛みしめる
    Japanese(日本語) Book

    Kim So Yeon et al / 김소연 / 2023 / -

    心の傷もわかりあえなさも、 すべてを詩にしたとき、母を愛せるようになった――。 この世の痛みの声に耳を澄ます詩人が、 母、父、心の傷、そして回復までを綴ったエッセイ集。 source: https://www.hanmoto.com/bd/isbn/9784910904016

  • The Colors of Dawn
    English(English) Book Available

    Kim Sun-woo et al / 김선우 et al / 2016 / KDC구분 > literature > Korean Literature > Complete Collection > Library > Complete Collection & Library (more than 2 writers)

    Throughout the twentieth century, few countries in Asia suffered more from foreign occupation, civil war, and international military conflict than Korea. The Colors of Dawn brings together the moving and powerful voices of over forty Korean poets from these turbulent years. From 1903 to 1945, the Japanese Empire occupied the Korean peninsula and instituted measures to annihilate the nation and its culture. After Japan's defeat in WWII, Korea became a killing ground during the Korean War (1950 to 1953). During this period and into the 1980s, South Korea was controlled by a military dictatorship, and today it remains on war footing. In the midst of internal and external conflicts, Korea's poets—threatened by the authorities with torture, imprisonment, and death—found ways to express their fierce desire for freedom and self-governance. The result is a century of outstanding poetry, from Sim Hun (1901) to more familiar modern and contemporary poets, such as Kim Chi-ha and Ko Ŭn. Source: http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9566-9780824866228.aspx

  • 一文字の辞典
    Japanese(日本語) Book

    Kim So Yeon et al / 김소연 / 2021 / KDC구분 > literature > Korean Literature

    人は誰も自分だけの人生という言葉の辞典を持つ 詩人キム・ソヨンがハングル一文字の言葉を通して 人生のさまざまな時間、情景、感情を描いた 私的で詩的な一文字の辞典 「読んだ人がニヤッと笑ってくれたら嬉しいなと思っていた。うなずきながらページの余白に自分なりのまた別のニュアンスを書き込んでくれたらいいなとも思っていた。そうして私が書き記した定義と︑読者の手書きの定義が同じページに一緒に並んでいたら素敵だなと思っていた。 つまり、私の『一文字辞典』は読者が参加することによってはじめて完全な辞典となる。私と未知のあなた、私たち二人でこの本を完成させるのだ」 ――「はじめに―日本の読者に向けて」より Source : https://www.amazon.co.jp/-/en/キム・ソヨン/dp/4910214259/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=一文字の辞典&qid=1634517236&s=books&sr=1-1