Translated Books

We continually collect and provide bibliographic information on overseas publications of Korean literature (translated into over 48 languages).

15 results
  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    Kim Heesun et al / 김희선 et al / 2021 / literature > Periodical

    Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Each issue may include works of contemporary Korean writers and poets, as well as essays and book reviews by Korean studies professors in the United States. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences. Source : https://korea.fas.harvard.edu/publications/azalea-journal-korean-literature-culture-vol-14

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    Kim Kyung-uk et al / 김경욱 et al / 2019 / literature > Periodical

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    Cheon Myungkwan et al / 천명관 et al / 2018 / literature > Periodical

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    - / - / 2017 / literature > Periodical

    Editors Note: Once again, readers will discover a rich and varied array of contemporary Korean literary and image work in the current issue of Azalea journal. We celebrate the 100th anniversary of the births of two of the twentieth century's great Korean writers, Midang So Chongju, the poet, and Hwang Sunwon, the short story and novel writer. Periodically, as the cultural, political, and historical tides in Korea have fallen and risen only to fall and rise again, these two writers have been lionized, denigrated, taken as emblems of Korea's literary capabilities and accomplishments, or set to the side as passé, out-of-sync, politically unacceptable, or just too old to matter. Yet readers will find a rich array of reflections on these two writers and examples of their literary accomplishments. May you savor and treasure. Let us resolve to keep these writers central to our understanding of the terrain that Korean literature traversed in the twentieth century and to comprehend how much it would lose if it did not value, even treasure, these and others in the twenty-first. Then we find writers who have taken the stage in the twentyfirst century, now already a century since So Chongju and Hwang Sunwon were born. Contemporary fiction from our featured writer, Lee Eyunkee, whose work gives a new, contemporary meaning to that term, is followed by the work of a series of poets and other fiction writers of today, as well as a nostalgic glance back at the twentieth-century poet Chong Chiyong. Readers are invited once again to savor the results of Chicago's Sejong Cultural Society's annual sijo-writing contest. Nearly one thousand entries came in, from all over. It is a pleasure to see the enthusiasm for the sijo growing among younger writers in their English-language practice of the form and to be able to make room for their works in our journal. One hundred years from now, may Korean poetry and fiction, graphic arts, photography, and yes, the sijo, be more widely known and ever more deeply appreciated. Finally, we are grateful for the encouragement and support that the International Communication Foundation has provided to Azalea's growth and vitality as a literary journal dedicated to these ends. Yet we join with the Foundation and with family members in sadness at the passing last year of Dr. Yeo Seok-ki, the Foundation's president. A dedicated visionary in seeking to encourage the wider and deeper appreciation of Korean literature, Dr. Yeo was also a nimble raconteur and conversationalist. I enjoyed the luncheon meetings that I was fortunate to have with him over the years, as well as the more formal communications regarding workshops and other program initiatives. He was always there, and he will be--in our thoughts, memories, and hearts. David R. McCann April, 2015, in Watertown

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book Available

    SORA KIM-RUSSELL et al / 김소라 et al / 2016 / literature > Periodical

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book Available

    Lee Eyunkee et al / 이윤기 et al / 2015 / literature > Periodical

    Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, vol. 8 (2015) Posted on 8 June 2015 by pwilson6 | Leave a comment Editor’s Note David R. McCann, ix In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Once again, readers will discover a rich and varied array of contemporary Korean literary and image work in the current issue of Azalea journal. We celebrate the 100th anniversary of the births of two of the twentieth century’s great Korean writers, Midang Sŏ Chŏngju, the poet, and Hwang Sunwŏn, the short story and novel writer. Periodically, as the cultural, political, and historical tides in Korea have fallen and risen only to fall and rise again, these two writers have been lionized, denigrated, taken as emblems of Korea’s literary capabilities and accomplishments, or set to the side as passé, out-of-sync, politically unacceptable, or just too old to matter. Yet readers will find a rich array of reflections on these two writers and examples of their literary accomplishments. May you savor and treasure. Let us resolve to keep these writers central to our understanding of the terrain that Korean literature traversed in the twentieth century and to comprehend how much it would lose if it did not value, even treasure, these and others in the twenty-first.     Writer in Focus: Lee Eyunkee   Translator’s Note Tahee Lee, 1 In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Lee Eyunkee, or Yi Yun-gi as published in Germany, is admittedly better known in Korea for his translations and non-fiction works on Greek and Roman mythology than his works of fiction or essays. This, however, does not reflect the emphasis he placed on, or the time and effort he poured into, writing fiction. In one of his essays, explaining his decision in 1991 to scale down his translating career and leave for the United States, he admits: “Translating was important to me. But it wasn’t the most important work for me. “I had debuted in 1977 as a writer, but since publishing my first collection of short stories in 1988, I hadn’t written a single proper novel. The trifling reputation and fairly good money I earned as a translator were holding me back by the ankle.” (“To Crawl the Bottom” from Writing That Makes Zorba Dance) He confesses in the same essay that when he returned to Korea temporarily to receive the Dong-in Literary Award in 1998 he thought that the years he spent abroad “let him come back to being a writer.”   The Bow Tie Lee Eyunkee and Tahee Lee, 5 In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Unless you live in a small country where there are only a handful of schools, it would be extremely rare for you to have a lifelong classmate, someone who went to the same school with you from elementary school through middle and high school all the way up to college. Yet I do have such a rare friend. His name is Pak Nosu. There are people in this world who give the school system too much credit and think Pak Nosu and I would be similar in our ways of thinking and behaving, but that is not true. A man does not stand alone. I think each man has a universal subconscious which preserves everything from his family’s household history to the history of humanity. That is why I consider education to be ancillary—like bridesmaids and groomsmen at a wedding—when a man faces the times by himself. It was probably the times that made me a lifelong schoolmate of my friend Pak Nosu whose portrait I am now going to attempt to paint by stippling. An event considered coincidental in one era might turn out to be inevitable in another. The characteristics of an age often blur the line between chance and necessity. When Nosu and I were in school, it was considered a virtue for a man’s personal and social values to be completely consistent with those of others. In that age, men hesitated to step out of the bounds of shared values if they could help it. In that age, there was one sure formula: Don’t get any ideas into your head! If you were branded “the kid with ideas,” the road to recovery was going to be a long one. Imagination was a dangerous thing.       Notes on Contributors, 406   Source: https://uhpjournals.wordpress.com/2015/06/08/azalea-journal-of-korean-literature-culture-vol-8-2015/

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book Available

    - / - / 2014 / literature > Periodical

    Editor’s Note David R. McCann From: Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture  Volume 7, 2014  pp. 9-10 | 10.1353/aza.2014.0015 In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:   What a range of literary and visual work lies before you, O most fortunate readers of Azalea Volume Seven: poetry, prose, images! There is an extended conversational dialogue between the scholars and cultural theorists Kim Uchang and Karatani Kojin, as well as an excerpt from Korea’s first ancient novel, if the 17th century Kuunmong, Nine Cloud Dream counts as ancient, having appeared several decades before Daniel Defoe’s first Western novel, Robinson Crusoe. We also have contemporary fiction, poetry, and flash fiction; visual work, both apart from text as well as embedded in it, shaping it; and voices ranging from the Korean American writers gathered together by Heinz Insu Fenkl and Minsoo Kang, to a dog’s own words in the story “Frank & Jindori” by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee. Jack Saebyok Jung’s introduction and translation of Yi Sang’s (1910-1937) “Paradise Lost” prose/poems gives us yet another perspective on one of twentieth-century Korea’s most irreducibly modern writers. If all this were not enough, there is a section of, by, and pertaining to the undersigned, the journal’s Editor, with reflections of his own variously framed encounters over the decades with the people, culture, and literature of Korea. As some may have noted, Azalea does not pursue an established theory line; or I do not. In translating Korean poetry into English, I have been aware of the gravitational pull of the poem’s shape in the original language, and of my intent to remake the poem, like a clay pot, in the other, English. To push the metaphor just a bit, I do not seek to break the original poem down into its parts, into the clay bits or the glaze constituents, then reconstitute them all over here. I like to try to make another pot, just like the first one, that will hold an equal amount of interest, interpretive gesture, sense of volume, and space as the original. I might turn here to Robert Hass who, in his Foreword to Joseph Cadora’s new translation of Rilke’s New Poems from Copper Canyon Press, suggests that a translation may have a certain advantage over an original poem, as it reminds the reader that the “absolute poem” is always still out there. Over the years, each issue of Azalea has brought together a remarkably wide range of literary and visual artwork from “out there.” The International Communication Foundation (Seoul), has shared our vision for what translating and publishing Korean literature can accomplish. I note their support with gratitude. I note also with thanks the Korean Literature Translation Institute’s encouragement and financial support over the years, and with regret, the conclusion of that support with our previous issue, Volume Six. As we all go forward, I express the confident hope that many readers will enjoy the materials gathered in this issue. May teachers find examples of forms, voices, and subjects which they can use in their classrooms to bring students toward a deeper understanding and appreciation of Korean literature, from present-day to historical, and from what is made in Korea in the Korean language, all the way to works written in English in the U.S. May you feel inspired, as I have been, to follow the paths that open. March, 2014   David R. McCann   David R. McCann is the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Literature at Harvard University. He is the recipient of numerous prizes, grants, and fellowships, including the Order of Cultural Merit award (2006), one of the highest decorations by the Korean government, and the Manhae Prize in Arts and Sciences (2004). Not only a renowned translator of major Korean poets but also a recognized poet, he has published his own poems in such distinguished journals as Poetry, Ploughshares, Descant, and Runes. Urban Temple, a collection of his sijo poems, a Korean verse form, was published in 2010 by Bo-Leaf Press, with a Korean-English version from Changbi Publications in 2012.   Copyright © 2014 President and Fellows of Harvard College Project MUSE® - View Citation  

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book Available

    Kim Kyung-uk. Kim Jung-hyuk et al / 신혜린 et al / 2013 / literature > Periodical

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    - / - / 2012 / literature > Periodical

    An enterprising teenager in Malawi builds a windmill from scraps he finds around his village and brings electricity, and a future, to his family.

  • AZALEA (Journal of Korean Literature & Culture)
    English(English) Book

    - / - / 2011 / literature > Periodical

    How do writers make it new in their work? How do they find new readers, publishers, and in this new century, languages and audiences beyond the southern half of the Korean peninsula? Azalea has sought to embody and exemplify that quest, publishing the new work of today's Korean literary world, and seeking to make connections, to be a bridge to readers in the English language realms of North America and elsewhere.