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    KOREAN FEMINISTS IN TRANSLATION: GENIUS DISASTER TOURIST GUIDE

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    August 11, 2020
    In some ways, Yun, now 40, stands in solidarity with her sister authors of the post-2018 #MeToo movement. She’s highly educated (a graduate of Dongguk University), prolific (has authored several novels, plus three short story collections), is highly-regarded by the literary establishment (winner of...
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    SOUTH KOREA: THE LAW OF LINES – THEY’RE MADE TO BE CROSSED

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    Jul 9, 2020
    The Law of Lines (Arcade Publishing), by Pyun Hye-yung, may be the most fiercely feminist novel of the South Korean #MeToo literary wave to make a splash in America this year. It’s remarkably strident.
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    SOUTH KOREA: BIG GAINS AND NOTHING LOST IN TRANSLATION

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    July 22, 2020
    ANDREA PLATE WRITES — Imagine watching your mother and grandmother being stabbed to death in a random attack on Christmas Eve, and showing no emotion. This is Yunjae, the protagonist of Sohn Won-Pyung’s Almond (HarperVia), first published in 2017 and translated into English this May. Why the title...
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    BOOK REVIEW: A SOUTH KOREAN AUTHOR TELLS A UNIVERSAL TALE

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    June 10, 2020
    So says Kim Sagwa, author of four acclaimed novels and two short story collections, who knows something about adolescent angst. This pre-eminent South Korean literary star, dubbed by some the voice of a generation, was once a high-school drop-out. For all her adult success, Kim Sagwa, now 36, who...
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    SOUTH KOREA: IS WORLD-FAMOUS AUTHOR BAE SUAH “UN-KOREAN?”

    U.S.A.
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    May 27, 2020
    Why, for the past fifteen years, has literary icon Bae Suah — author of at least twelve sensationally popular surrealist novels, several short story collections, winner of two Korean literary prizes and a world-famous translator of other novelists — been called, by some critics, “un-Korean?”
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    KOREA: NEW WAVE LITERATURE AS WOMEN’S LIBERATION

    U.S.A.
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    May 7, 2020
    ANDREA PLATE WRITES – (This is the first in an original series about new wave feminist writers in Korea). It was big news in 2016 when the novel Kim Ji-young, 1982, by author Cho Nam-Joo, awakened a semi-somnolent women’s movement in South Korea. The book sold one million copies—only the second...